Heavy rain

Tag: Defences

Suburban Neighbourhood Adaptation for a Changing Climate (SNACC)

Oxford Brookes University

September 2009 – December 2012

Adaptation to changes in the climate are important to suburban neighbourhoods, where 84% of the British population choose to live. Specific building-level adaptation opportunities relating to flooding include: green roofs, SUDs, rainwater capture, storage and use; increases in gutter, downpipe and drainage size; moving all electrical outlets, metering, boiler and electrical equipment above flood level; replacing carpet and wood floods with permeable surfaces; raising entry thresholds; adding overhangs and shading elements that can block driving rain; local knowledge of individuals; re-organising dwelling contents so nothing important is on the lower level.

Research Council: EPSRC

Twenty65 – can rainwater be captured, treated and reused?

University of Sheffield

January 2016 – January 2021

In the UK the status quo for all water applications is to use chlorinated drinking water. However, rainwater (water captured from roofs) and greywater (water recovered from showers and sinks) can be easily captured, treated and re-used. This ongoing research programme looks at using buildings as collection devices, routing the rainwater through guttering and downpipes and into storage tanks, and how it should be possible to both reduce the volume of rainwater reaching urban drains, and to save that water for local (re)use.

Research Council: EPSRC

Urban flood resilience in an uncertain future

University of Nottingham

2018

The project aims to enable the coordinated planning, design and operation of closely coupled urban water systems necessary to achieve transformative change in urban flood risk and water management. It will investigate how planning, design, operation and organisation of both existing and new urban water systems might be envisaged and transformed in order to deliver multiple benefits (including flood resilience) under flood, normal and drought conditions.

Research Council: